Katy Perry’s Secret of All Secrets

Is in accomplished hands of Patricia Bragg

Katy Perry's Secret of all Secrets

Katy Perry's Secret of all Secrets

It’s summer so traditionally we Americans have nothing better to do than to lament Miley Cyrus’ summertime publicity twerk. But if we could shift the conversation, a better focus might be on someone more seasoned and accomplished: Patricia Bragg is someone who truly is changing the world for the better and about whom we would much rather be talking—especially since she has been such an influence on another diva, Katy Perry.

It’s summer so traditionally we Americans have nothing better to do than to lament Miley Cyrus’ summertime publicity twerk. But if we could shift the conversation, a better focus might be on someone more seasoned and accomplished: Patricia Bragg is someone who truly is changing the world for the better and about whom we would much rather be talking—especially since she has been such an influence on another diva, Katy Perry.

To Patricia: Love you so much. Your Apple Cider Vinegar is my secret of ALL secrets! Love, Katy Perry

If you don’t know who exactly Patricia Bragg is, think again: Bragg Raw Certified Organic Apple Cider Vinegar is one of the most well-known health brands in the super market.

If you squeeze juice out of apples, you get apple juice. Fermentation of that juice with bacteria and yeasts will transform that juice into hard (alcoholic) apple cider. Yet further fermentation yields the puckery elixir known as apple cider vinegar. This alchemical transformation happens as sugars are broken down into alcohol, which then breaks further down into vinegar.

Using the best and most appropriate vinegars for dressings and cooking elevates flavors to new heights. And as if that weren’t enough to recommend it, vinegar has many medicinal uses as well as many household uses. It’s no wonder vinegar has been a dietary and healing staple for most of human civilization.

Patricia and her father Paul Bragg have spread the gospel of their healthy lifestyle as nobody else for over 100 years, starting in 1912. Paul Bragg opened the nation’s first health food store in Hollywood, California, and was responsible for introducing many of America’s first health foods. Together with daughter Patricia, the duo has penned some dozen health books that have had an enormously positive influence on emotional and physiological well being. Patricia herself has met with every president since Richard Nixon to consult on personal health.

Two or three times a day we enjoy Bragg Apple Cider Vinegar with concord grape, ginger or honey. These low calories drinks immediately restore vitality to our withered energies if we are down, calm the crabby tummy inundated with junk food and enliven brain power. Who knows exactly why apple cider vinegar is so well loved by the human body? Science tells us ACV slows down sugar absorption, stabilizing blood glucose levels. But quite possibly this ancient remedy is simply a necessary food.

ACV AND WEIGHT LOSS

Studies demonstrate that vinegar can help shed pounds and improve heart health.

It’s the component that makes vinegar–the tart, sour acetic acid produced during the fermentation process–that appears to show the most distinct promise as an aid in weight loss and heart health.

Last year three exciting studies on this subject were published by Japanese researchers. The first involved the administration of acetic acid to laboratory rats. The rates of fatty acid oxidation (how fast their bodies break down fats to burn as energy) and the level of fatty acid oxidation enzymes in their livers rose in rats given acetic acid. These studies also found that acetic acid reduced body fat accumulation without any change in food consumption or muscle mass.

The second study looked at the effect of acetic acid on blood glucose levels and fat metabolism in “fatty” rats bred to develop type 2 diabetes–a form of the disease that develops in overweight humans and that dramatically raises risk of cardiovascular disease. When given acetic acid by mouth, these rotund rats put on less fat in both their livers and in their adipose tissue. A 2007 study on diabetic human subjects found that blood glucose levels were four to six percent lower in those who took two tablespoons of apple cider vinegar before bed than in those who didn’t. This would reduce the harmful impact of too-high blood sugar on blood vessel walls–one aspect of type 2 diabetes that threatens heart health.

Once this compelling evidence in vinegar’s favor had accumulated, Japanese researchers gathered a group of obese human subjects, all of whom had similar body weight, body mass index and waist circumference. Subjects were then divided into three smaller groups: one that drank a beverage containing 15 milliliters of apple cider vinegar; another that daily, for 12 weeks, drank a beverage with 30 milligrams of vinegar; and one that drank a beverage containing no vinegar. The trial was double-blind, meaning that neither the researchers nor the subjects knew who was drinking which beverage.

By the end of the 12 weeks, both vinegar groups had lower body weight, body mass index (BMI), visceral fat area, waist circumference and triglycerides. Visceral fat is the fat stored in the gut among the organs, beneath the abdominal muscles–a type of fat that is higher-risk in terms of heart health. Triglycerides are fats that float around in the circulation; high triglycerides are harmful to cardiovascular health as well. Vinegar-drinking subjects in the study had more active fatty acid oxidation enzymes in their livers, which may help explain the differences between vinegar and non-vinegar groups.

Why should you choose apple cider vinegar? Apple cider vinegar comes from the fruit we’re advised to eat once a day to keep the doctor away. Fermentation is an ages-old process that essentially “predigests” foods and makes their nutrients more bioavailable while transforming some of those nutrients into even more high-powered, health-enriching versions of themselves. And if it’s raw, organic apple cider vinegar–which is undistilled and enzyme-rich–is rich in potassium, trace minerals, silicon and pectins (a type of fiber that lowers cholesterol and supports good digestion). ACV also helps prevent heartburn if sipped in a glass of warm water before meals. Doing this also helps create a feeling of fullness that reduces caloric intake in the meal that follows.

To glean ACV’s benefits, add 1-2 tablespoons of ACV to eight ounces of water. Add 1-2 tablespoons of honey if the taste doesn’t agree with you or simply enjoy Bragg’s line of ACV drinks with acai, concord grape, ginger or honey.

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